“DangeRuss” (PRINT)

$30.00$70.00

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Additional Information
Weight .02 lbs
Dimensions 18 × .01 × 12 in
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Digitally-signed, HAND-signed

DETAILS

Size: 12″ x 18″

Paper: high-quality 130# Sterling

 

 

 

 

DANGERUSS

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Final drawing: “Russell Wilson”. 14” x 24”. Pencil on paper.

“DangeRuss” (PRINT)

$30.00$70.00

Clear
SKU: N/A Category:
Additional Information
Weight .02 lbs
Dimensions 18 × .01 × 12 in
Versions

Digitally-signed, HAND-signed

A post shared by Keegan Hall (@keegan.hall) on

Literally adding the final details. It has been a long time in the making and one of the most challenging drawing lacked that I’ve ever done.

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Russell’s face mask seems to be a relatively small area to draw, but it’s surprisingly detailed and definitely taking longer than planned. No worries. Not rushing this piece at all. It’s a turtle race!

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Coming down the home stretch! Finishing the face mask and then on to the background. The face mask is surprisingly detailed. Lots of slightly gradations that need to be accurately captured in order to make the bars look round. The closer I look, the more detail I see. It’s never ending. I’m going subatomic! lol ✏🙌🏈

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Light can be a tricky thing to render – especially in high-contrast images. You have to train your eye to really see the subtle changes that the light casts across the subject. For example, in the face mask, there’s a bright white shine on the right side, which is immediately followed by a dark line / edge. These miniscule details are easy to miss since the eye doesn’t naturally process that they’re there. But in the finished piece, they make all the difference.

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Slowly working my way down this piece. So much high contrast shine and reflection all over the face. Much of the shading seems counterintuitive from a typical face, but I’m drawing exactly what I see and it definitely feel accurate (the gloss on the skin from the sweat).

In fact, on of the hardest things to overcome is to draw exactly WHAT we see versus what we THINK we see. Our minds already have an idea of what, for example, a nose *should* look like. This predisposition can heavily influence how we draw, and can alter the accuracy of the final piece.

I regularly step back and view my work to ensure accuracy, and to minimize my own influence of how something *should* look.

 

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One of the most underrated “skills” when it comes to drawing is PATIENCE.

I used to get bored halfway through a drawing and then speed through the second half just so I could be done with it. In the end, I didn’t create a piece that truly captured what I’m capable of drawing.

Now, I’m mentally prepared for the long process (40-60+ hours of drawing time) and, since I now know what to expect, I’m able to enjoy the entire process from start to finish. As they say, the journey is the destination.

And that’s the way creating art is supposed to be.

A post shared by Keegan Hall (@keegan.hall) on

Fixed the proportions of the upper/front section of Russell’s helmet, and started locking in the detail. It’s crazy how many fine details are in the bars of the face mask… and I want to capture all of them! I’ll get this piece to a “finished” state and THEN go back and double-down on adding even the smallest details. I’m going all out on this one! ✏ 🙌 🏈

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Just getting started on the eyes. Lots of contrast in this area where the light is shining on his face. Definitely having fun with this one!

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Sketching out the face and blocking in where the darker shading areas will be. Just want to have rough map of the facial feature.

Oh, and I just spent three hours drawing individual skin pours and wrinkles on Russell’s neck! haha

For me, it’s the smallest details that make the largest impact, which is why I spend so much time refining my work. I’ve see a lot of drawings that looks great from far away but, as you get closer to the work, the fine details begin to break up.

I really want the viewer to see different/more details as they get closer to my work. I think it’s pretty cool for a two-dimensional piece of art to offer such different viewing experiences based on how far away the viewer is from the work. Hopefully the “wow” factor increases and the experience becomes more enjoyable the closer you get. At least, that’s the goal.

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I’ve decided to go back and start refining the details of the sections that I’ve already drawn before going on to other areas of this piece. It’s easy to get lost in a drawing of this size and with this much planned detail, and not really know which areas are actually finished. Once I get the details locked in for these sections over the next few days then I’ll start on Russell’s face!

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Well, this piece is already proving to be a challenge. I typically like drawing one area at a time before moving on. For example, I completely finish the jersey before starting the helmet. That approach usually works because each section is pretty small so I can finish one within 2-3 hours. However, in this drawing, each section is quite large. I’m already ~8 hours in, and none of the sections I’ve drawn so far are completed. I’m definitely gonna have to reassess my strategy for this drawing. Still a loooong way to go, but I’m confident that I’ll get it figured out! ✏🙏🙌

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As I’ve mentioned before, I’m still learning to draw again, but I feel like each new drawing is better than the previous so I’m heading in the right direction.
My goal is to improve every day. EVERY day.
We only get better at something when we push ourselves beyond what we think is possible. If you’re not scared, then you’re not giving yourself an opportunity to truly reach your peak potential.
Well, the next piece that I’m drawing scares me. And that’s exciting.
I just started on this 60+ hour drawing, and it’s going to be amazing… or it could be terrible, if I can’t pull it off. That uncertainty, for me, is exhilarating.
I always try to add as much detail as possible to make the drawing look “real.” With this drawing, I’m attempting a higher level of detail than I’ve ever done.

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